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توجه ! این یک نسخه آرشیو شده میباشد و در این حالت شما عکسی را مشاهده نمیکنید برای مشاهده کامل متن و عکسها بر روی لینک مقابل کلیک کنید : Touch Switch



arsalan681
25-01-2010, 23:41
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Touch Switch
A touch switch is a switch that is turned on and off by touching a wire contact, instead of flicking a lever like a regular switch. Touch switches have no mechanical parts to wear out, so they last a lot longer than regular switches. Touch switches can be used in places where regular switches would not last, such as wet or very dusty areas.
Schematic
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Parts
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Notes
• The contacts an be made with just two loops of wire close together, or two squares etched close together on a PC board.
• When activated, the output of the circuit goes high for about one second. This pulse can be used to drive a relay, transistor, other logic, etc.
• You can vary the length of the output pulse by using a smaller or larger capacitor for C1

arsalan681
25-01-2010, 23:42
Simple Touch Switch Circuit
Similar to the CMOS based, this transistor based touch switch can activate a load simply by the user touching a metal plate. It is designed to directly switch a relay to allow it to be used with large loads. As it uses only a few commonly available transistors and a 12V supply, it is ideal for hostile environments where mechanical switches would be damaged. Using a latching relay and two of these circuits, a simple two pad "touch on/touch off" arrangement can be made.
Schematic
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Parts
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Notes
• The touch pad can be most easily made by cutting a small square of PCB material and then soldering on a single wire. Alternatively, something like a penny glued to a plastic backing will do the job.
• As mentioned, a latching relay can be used so that a momentary touch activates the relay and it remains active. To turn off a latching relay, power must be interrupted. So a 2nd circuit with a normal relay can be used to cut power (use the NC contacts on the 2nd circuit). Placed side by side, two touch pads form an "on" and an "off" pad.